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If you would like to learn more about becoming a County Coordinator and a part of The CAGenWeb Project, or if you have any other questions relating to this county, please read our Policies & Procedures and then contact our State Coordinator.

The CAGenWeb Project sincerely thanks the dedicated volunteers who devoted time and effort toward making this site a successful one:

Sunni Bloyd, County Coordinator 1996-2000
Ray Ensing, County Coordinator 2000-2008
Joe Markovich, County Coordinator 2009-2011
John Reeder, County Coordinator 2011-2014
Michelle Hoftiezer, County Coordinator 2014-2017

State Coordinator: Elizabeth E. Bullard
Assistant State Coordinator: Marc Irish
Assistant State Coordinator: Bob Jenkins

 

A Little Bit About Fresno County

California Map with Fresno Highlighted

The area now known as Fresno County was the traditional homeland of Yokuts and Mono peoples and later was settled by Spaniards during a search for suitable mission sites. In 1846, this area became part of the United States as a result of the Mexican War.

Fresno County was formed in 1856 from parts of Mariposa, Merced and Tulare counties. Fresno is Spanish for "ash tree" and it was in recognition of the abundance of the shrubby local Ash, Fraxinus dipetala, growing along the San Joaquin River that it received its name. Parts of Fresno County's territory were given to Mono County in 1861 and to Madera County in 1893. The original county seat was along the San Joaquin River in Millerton, but was moved to the rapidly growing town of Fresno on the newly built Southern Pacific Railroad line after a flood destroyed much of the town.

The settling of Fresno County was not without its conflicts, land disputes, and other natural disasters. Floods caused immeasurable damage and fires also plagued the settlers of Fresno County. In 1882, the greatest of the early day fires wiped out an entire block of the city of Fresno, and was followed by another devastating blaze in 1883.

At the same time, residents brought irrigation, electricity, and extensive agriculture to the area. Moses Church developed the first canals, called "Church Ditches," for irrigation. These canals allowed extensive cultivation of wheat. Francis Eisen, leader of the wine industry in Fresno County, also began the raisin industry in 1875, when he accidentally let some of his grapes dry on the vine. A.Y. Easterby and Clovis Cole (aka the "Wheat King of the Nation") developed extensive grain and cattle ranches. These and other citizens laid the groundwork for the cultivation of Fresno County – now one of the nation's leading agricultural regions. In more recent times cotton became a major crop in Fresno and the southern San Joaquin Valley, but recent drought and lower demand have lessened cotton's importance to the local economy.

The discovery of oil in the western part of the county, near the town of Coalinga at the foot of the Coast Ranges, brought about an economic boom in the 1900s, even though the field itself was known at least as early as the 1860s. By 1910, Coalinga Oil Field, the largest field in Fresno County, was the most richly productive oil field in California; a dramatic oil gusher in 1909, the biggest in California up until that time, was an event of sufficient excitement to cause the Los Angeles Stock Exchange to close for a day so that its members could come by train to view it. The Coalinga field continues to produce oil, and is currently the eighth-largest field in the state.

More than thirty structures in Fresno County are on the National Register of Historic Places, including the Fresno Water Tower, which once held over 250,000 US gallons of water for the city of Fresno, the Meux Home, and Kearney Mansion Museum.

Project Links:

The CAGenWeb Project
CAGenWeb Brochure (pdf file)
The USGenWeb Project
USGenWeb Special Projects
The WorldGenWeb Project

Queries:

County Message Board (Ancestry.com)
County Forum (Genealogy.com)

Neighboring Counties

Neighboring Counties Map

Madera (north)
Mono (northeast)
Inyo (east)
Tulare (south and east)
Kings (south and east)
Monterey (south-southwest)
San Benito (north and west)
Merced (northwest)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This site was updated last on 21-Jan-2018 21:31.