Placer County

CAGenWeb

A proud part of CAGenWeb

and USGenWeb

Welcome to Placer County CAGenWeb!  We are a proud part of CAGenWeb and USGenWeb.

So glad to see you here. I am the new county coordinator and my name is Trish Elliott-Kashima.  More will be added bi-weekly until I get all of the prior site uploaded.

New on 6/19/2018: Information about Dry Creek Elementary School - help save this historic school.  New on 6/17/2018:  Obits with surnames starting with N, O, P.

 Please consider sharing information on your Placer County ancestors, old photographs, histories, bible records, census records, land records, family group sheets, etc.   

Bible Records - please submit yours

Biographies

Cemeteries

Census

Communities/Towns

Directories

Family Group Sheets

Historic Churches

Historic Schools

History

Maps

Medical terms of the 1800s

Military

New Items

Newspaper Abstracts

Obituaries

Photos

Queries

Resources

Vitals (Births, Marriages, Deaths)

Wills and Probate - please share

Placer County was home to the peaceful (Nisenan) Maidu and Miwok Native Americans for hundreds of years before the discovery of gold in 1848 brought hordes of miners from around the world.  Only three years after the discovery of gold, the fastest growing county was formed from portions of Sutter and Yuba Counties on April 25, 1851 with Auburn as the County seat. Placer County took its name from the Spanish word for sand or gravel deposits containing gold. Miners washed away the gravel, leaving the heavier gold, in a process known as "placer mining".

Gold mining was a major industry through the 1880s, but gradually the new residents turned to farming the fertile foothill soil, harvesting timber and working for the Southern Pacific Railroad.  Auburn was settled when Claude Chana discovered fold in Auburn Ravine in May 1848 and later became a shipping and supply center for the surrounding gold camps.  The cornerstone of Placer's beautiful and historic courthouse, which is clearly visible from Interstate 80 through Auburn, was laid on July 4, 1894.  The building itself was renovated during the late 1980's and continues to serve the public today with courtrooms, a historic sheriff's office and the Placer County Museum. 

Roseville, once a small agricultural center, became a major railroad center and grew to the county's most populous city after the Southern Pacific Railroad moved its railroad switching yards there in 1908.  Loomis and Newcastle began as mining towns, but soon became centers of a booming fruit-growing industry, supporting many local packing houses.  Penryn was founded by a welsh miner.  The town of Griffith turned from mining to establish a large granite quarry.  Rocklin began as a railroad town and became home to a number of granite quarries.  Rapidly growing Rocklin now views with Roseville for the honor of being Placer's largest city.  Lincoln and Sheridan continue to support ranching and farming. 

Lincoln also is the home of one of the county's oldest businesses, the Gladding McBean terra cotta clay manufacturing plant established in 1875.

Founded by Charles Gladding (1828-1894), Peter McGill Bean  and George Chambers, who started the company with $12,000.

Production started with clay sewer pipes in 1875 for San Francisco.  They did many projects in San Francisco including the Crocker Building and helping to rebuild parts of San Francisco after the 1906 quake.

Placer County, 1887

Neighboring Counties:

Nevada County CAGenWeb

Washoe County NVGenWeb

El Dorado County CAGenWeb

Sacramento County CAGenWeb

Sutter County CAGenWeb

Yuba County CAGenWeb

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Many thanks for prior County Coordinators

for their work on this site:

Patricia Rowell, County Coordinator 1996-1997
Ken Gissy, County Coordinator 1997-2010
Kathie Marynik, County Co-Coordinator 2010
Jeannette M. Harper, County Coordinator 2010-2017

Our State Coordinator is Elizabeth E Bullard

Assistant State Coordinators are Marc Irish and Bob Jenkins

County Coordinator is Trish Elliott-Kashima

 

 

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This page was last updated on -06/19/2018